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HeardTell Blog

This post concludes Zoe Rhine’s series on the occupations of Black Women in Asheville in 1890. Soon, BCSC will be looking for other community members to submit pieces to HeardTell. Be on the lookout for an announcement, soon! Read the previous installments of this series here:Part One | Part Two | Part Three | Part
Over the next several weeks Buncombe County Special Collections will share five different posts by former Special Collections (NC Room) Librarian Zoe Rhine. Since “retiring” in January 2020, Zoe has continued to follow her research interests; investigating the lives of African Americans in the late 19th century. Do you have research or stories about Asheville
Over the next several weeks Buncombe County Special Collections will share five different posts by former Special Collections (NC Room) Librarian Zoe Rhine. Since “retiring” in January 2020, Zoe has continued to follow her research interests; investigating the lives of African Americans in the late 19th century. Do you have research or stories about Asheville
Over the next several weeks Buncombe County Special Collections will share five different posts by former Special Collections (NC Room) Librarian Zoe Rhine. Since “retiring” in January 2020, Zoe has continued to follow her research interests; investigating the lives of African Americans in the late 19th century. Do you have research or stories about Asheville
Over the next several weeks Buncombe County Special Collections will share five different posts by former Special Collections (NC Room) Librarian Zoe Rhine. Since “retiring” in January 2020, Zoe has continued to follow her research interests; investigating the lives of African Americans in the late 19th century. Do you have research or stories about Asheville

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. visits WNC

In remembrance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, this year we are looking back at the two trips he made to Western North Carolina at the height of the civil rights movement. Dr. King’s first visit to the area was in January 1964, just a few short months after the assassination of President John F.
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